Small Size, Big Style

We all like to go out and find those big finds, but sometimes it seems that some of the biggest finds aren’t very big at all. Lately it seems that for all the square-footage eating things I drag home, it’s still often the little things that make me smile the most. Here’s a round-up of some of my recent little discoveries.

S&PThe other day while perusing Salvation Army, I spotted this pepper mill and salt shaker atop a rack of clothing. They’re about 12 inches tall, making their tapered forms and bright colors all the more dramatic in person. They’re nothing fancy, but they make me happy every time I see them in my green and orange kitchen. For a mere $1.49 for the pair, they’ll be providing many years of joy.

Museum_ClockOn a similar thrift store excursion, this time to Goodwill, I found this small brass clock for $3.99. It’s not something I’d normally be drawn to in a thrift store because it hides easily among the made-in-China riffraff, but it was sitting on the edge of a shelf and I thought it looked well designed. Known as the Museum Clock, it was designed for the Howard Miller Clock Company by Nathan George Horwitt in 1970. There was also a wall clock version in silver. This particular example was a corporate gift from Pioneer Hybrids, as the logo on the base indicates. It’s probably also a newer vintage than 1970—since it is stamped “Germany” it was produced after the 1989 reunification of West and East Germany. New or old, the beauty of a timeless design is that it’s timeless.

CatherineholmI picked up these Cathrineholm lotus bowls from a couple different sellers and I’m pretty pleased to find them. In recent years their popularity has soared, making them harder to find and more expensive to buy. Cathrineholm is actually not the name of a designer, rather the name of the company in Norway that produced them. The enamelware itself was designed by Grete Prytz Kittelsen, however the lotus design was added by the factory—much to the chagrin of Kittelsen—in an attempt to boost popularity. It worked. 40 years later we’re still after them.

Dansk_HolderSpeaking of Scandinavia, I found this Dansk candleholder at a garage sale this weekend for just 75 cents. I hadn’t seen this design before so I wasn’t immediately sure, but the texture of the metal felt right. Upon closer inspection in the daylight, I found the two marks I was looking for.

Denmark, check.

Denmark, check.

Dansk, check!

Dansk, check!

It is Dansk. Fortunately most Dansk pieces are marked, even if you have to really search for it. Some, however, are not. A good rule of thumb is, if it is painted jet black or made of lightweight metal, it’s probably not Dansk. Their holders tend to be a sort of raw iron texture with small, glossy glazed feet to protect furniture.

Dansk_GroupingThis makes a nice addition to my little growing collection of Dansk candleholders. A word to the wise, if you plan on using these you’d better start looking for tiny taper candles. Dansk holders have very, very narrow bases that usually only accommodate Dansk taper candles. I was lucky to find these blue ones at a garage sale for another 75 cents.

Long and lean, the Danes make a great candle

Long and lean, the Danes make a great candle

I can’t be sure from where this next find hales as it isn’t marked, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it were Danish as well. I’m usually not a mix and match mug sort of person. I like matching sets too much to go wild. But, I couldn’t resist this bright blue mug with its hand-decorated detailing. It’s serious and playful all at once.

IMG_0962Much like all these little objects, this guy just makes me happy when I see it. Small objects put the finishing touches on your home. Of course, with all this little stuff piling up, I might need to go out and find something big to hold it all.

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